Nope Trope Book Tag

Photo by Ivo Rainha on Pexels.com.

Let’s do a little book tag, shall we? Today’s trope is brought to you by Zoe’s All Booked. Zoe invented this tag and you can check out her Nope Trope Book Tag video right here. I first heard about this tag from eleanor sophie who heard about it from Book Me Some Time. The tag pokes fun at the various book tropes we often come across in books, such as in romance novels. I do love me a good trope. Keep reading to find out which trope is my favorite!

1. Eavesdropping with miscommunicationName a book you heard great things about and expected to love but ended up hating.

I don’t have one. I can’t recall a recent book that I heard great things about but ended up hating. So I’ll have to pass on this question. Not a bad problem to have.

2. Love Triangles – Name a series where you can’t pick your favourite book.

Any book in the Clara Vine series by the inimitable Jane Thynne. I cannot wait for the next book to come out. The series is set in pre-war Nazi Germany. The main character, Clara Vine, is a British actress living in Berlin. Her secret is that she is an informant for British Intelligence and is also part Jewish, which doubles her danger. I’m left at the edge of my seat as I’m reading the books; they are so good and so suspenseful. There is also a little bit of romance. I love a good spy heroine story, don’t you?

3. Not Like Other Girls/Didn’t Know I’m Beautiful – Name a book that has a pretty cover but was boring as all hell.

Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell. Look how pretty the book is!! It’s clothbound. It has beautiful, foliage motif running throughout the front and back. But it was a very boring read. Vignettes of village life with no real plot to keep me hooked. Beautiful but boring.

4. All-Consuming Love –Name a book that gave you a book hangover.

Long after I finished the last page of Square Haunting, I could not stop thinking about it. Square Haunting by Francesca Wade tells the real life stories of five incredible women who lived in the same neighborhood during the interwar years. It tells of their struggles and passions. I wrote about it here.

5. Douchebag Boyfriend – Name a book that took you a while to get into, but you ended up loving.

Belgravia by Julian Fellowes was a surprise. Initially I read a free ebook sample which bored me immensely. To be fair, when I downloaded the sample I was tired and should have gone to bed. Sometimes being tired does not make for good Regency reading. I bought the book while I was on vacation in Europe after I heard too many people raving about Belgravia. I am so glad I gave it a second chance, because it’s one of my favorite novels. I also really enjoyed the miniseries based on this book.

6. Tell us your favourite or least favourite trope!

I do enjoy a good enemies-to-lovers trope, which is why I’ll always love Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen.

It’s your turn. I tag all of you!!

xoxo, Jane

Spell the Month in Books – February

Hello! I saw this fun tag on Elaine Howlin’s blog and thought I’d give it a try. I think the idea is to spell out the books you want to read this month, but I’m cheating because I’m going to spell books I’ve read, books I won’t read and books I want to read. Here we go!

First up is Fashion: The Definitive History of Costume and Style. I picked it up at Costco and it’s been worth the purchase. It’s about the history of fashion and includes detailed timelines for every era. There is also an overwhelming amount of gorgeous illustrations and photography. I never tire of reading this book. For some reason, Amazon sellers are charging over $100.00 for a new copy. I bought mine at Costco for around $20.00. If you are interested, you should buy a used copy. I’d never pay that much for a book. There is no reason for it.

I haven’t read Elegance: The Beauty of French Fashion by Megan Hess yet, but I know I will enjoy it. I love reading Megan Hess’s beautiful books. If you haven’t heard of her, she is an illustrator and her books are illustrated tales of fashion history. This particular book is about the iconic fashion houses of Paris. Ooh la la.

Born to Rule: Five Reigning Consorts, Granddaughters of Queen Victoria by Julia P. Gelardi is a must read if you are interested in royal history; especially if you are fascinated by the descandants of Queen Victoria. The five granddaughters that are the subjects of the book are Tsarina Alexandra of Russia, Marie, Queen of Romania, Victoria Eugenie of Spain, and Queen Maud of Norway.

The Oxford Book of Royal Anecdotes edited by Elizabeth Longford is a fun compilation of facts and tidbits about the British royals from Boudicca to Elizabeth II. I picked it up at a library book sale and it’s fun to peruse it from time to time. The book also contains numerous genealogical charts which I find useful since I love reading royal history.

I have no intention of reading Urban Guerrilla Warfare by Anthony James Joes. I don’t own any books that begin with U so I borrowed this from my husband’s office. If you are interested in the guerrilla conflict of Warsaw in 1944 or Budapest in 1956 then you may want to pick up this book as it comes highly recommended by my lovely husband.

A Nervous Splendor by Frederic Morton is about 19th century Viennese history, first published in 1980. I haven’t read it yet, but I will.

The publisher’s description: On January 30, 1889, at the champagne-splashed hight of the Viennese Carnival, the handsome and charming Crown Prince Rudolf fired a revolver at his teenaged mistress and then himself. The two shots that rang out at Mayerling in the Vienna Woods echo still.

Frederic Morton, author of the bestselling Rothschilds, deftly tells the haunting story of the Prince and his city, where, in the span of only ten months, “the Western dream started to go wrong.” In Rudolf’s Vienna moved other young men with striking intellectual and artistic talents—and all as frustrated as the Prince. Among them were: young Sigmund Freud, Gustav Mahler, Theodor Herzl, Gustav Klimt, and the playwright Arthur Schnitzler, whose La Ronde was the great erotic drama of the fin de siecle. Morton studies these and other gifted young men, interweaving their fates with that of the doomed Prince and the entire city through to the eve of Easter, just after Rudolf’s body is lowered into its permanent sarcophagus and a son named Adolf Hitler is born to Frau Klara Hitler.

The Romanovs by Simon Sebag Montefiore tells the story of the history of the Romanovs, from beginning to end. I briefly began to read it just to get a taste, but I haven’t finished it yet. I do plan to read it soon though. It’s an excellent, detailed account of the fascinating history of the Romanovs.

I don’t own books that begin with Y (I do borrow from the library quite often and my personal collection is not extensive), so I paid a visit to my husband’s office and found Ypres: The First Battle 1914 by Ian F. W. Beckett. I have no intention of reading this book, but if you are interested in Word War I history my husband highly recommends it. (He is a WWI buff.)

And there you have it! February spelled out in books. This was super fun and I may do it again for March.

Have a great day!!

xoxo, Jane