Pairing books with tea (Belgravia)

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Belgravia by Julian Fellowes (of Downton Abbey fame) is a saga of a story that encompasses the lives of two families. One family is from “old money” and the other from “new money.” Both families reside in Belgravia. What I loved about this novel is that the vivid descriptions and scenes of Belgravia jumped out at me.

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So which tea would pair well with this book? What about Twinings Lady Grey tea?

It’s light and flavorful and not too strong. Perfect for those drawing room scenes for both families. I can almost imagine the characters sipping Twinings Lady Grey (even if Lady Grey wasn’t invented until the 1990s) out of their Royal Albert teacups (again, Royal Albert wasn’t around then either but we are just having fun here). So I think this tea would make a great pairing with our book today. But what do you think? xoxo, Jane

Pairing books with tea (Jane Thynne’s Black Roses)

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Black Roses by Jane Thynne is the first in a series set in pre-war Nazi Germany. It’s intense, nail-bitingly suspenseful and slightly romantic.

The main character, Clara Vine, moves to Nazi Germany from England to further her acting career. She is a talented actress but for some reason is not able to make the cut in England.

Upon the suggestion of an acquaintance, she relocates to Berlin to find work at the famous Babelsberg Studio. Once there, she unwittingly gets entangled with the inner circle of the Nazi wives. This proves to be of interest to British intelligence and soon they recruit her to spy for them.

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I love this series. It’s riveting. It has everything I want in a book: a strong woman, espionage, romance and history. I am waiting with great impatience for the next book in this series.

Which tea would go well with this book? How about Twinings China Rose? Clara is English. Twinings is a great English tea company. And China Rose tea is infused with roses. I’d say it’s a perfect match. What sayeth you? xoxo, Jane

PS. I also created a Pinterest board for this tea pairing because of course.

 

Pairing books with tea (Northanger Abbey)

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Northanger Abbey by the inimitable Jane Austen is a charming novel made even more wonderful by the novel’s heroine, Catherine Morland, who is darling. At least I think so.

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Northanger Abbey is a satire and a fun poke on gothic novels. Jane Austen really was spectacularly genius. If you haven’t read it yet, then be prepared. Simply put, this novel contains a darling heroine with an oversized imagination, silly characters, loving parents, a thriller-like abbey, a handsome young hero (hello, Mr. Tilney), his ridiculous, callous brother and their mean father. What’s not to love about this novel?

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“No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be a heroine.”

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So, this brings us to our cup of tea. Which tea would go well with this over-the-top faux gothic tale?

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Image via Fortnum & Mason, the best store in the whole wide world.

How about Fortnum’s Assam Superb? It’s dark and rich and full of flavor, just like Northanger Abbey.

I think this tea would make a fine cup of tea while you are reading (or watching) Northanger Abbey. What do you think?

You can read this novel for free at Project Guttenberg or you can buy this beautiful Penguin Clothbound Classics book on Amazon (affiliate link).

Also, because I like to be extra, there is a Pinterest board for this tea pairing. Happy Reading! xoxo, Jane

This post contains Amazon affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra to use the links, but it’s also ok if you don’t use the links. I’m just grateful you are here and reading my blog. xoxo, Jane

Pairing books with tea (Miss Buncle’s Book)

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Miss Buncle’s Book is ridiculously hilarious!

It’s a fun romp through a fictional sleepy village that furiously wakes up after someone (ahem, Miss Buncle) has been writing about them in a book.

Miss Buncle did not do a very good job of hiding real identities in her book. This gets the townspeople talking about who the anonymous writer might be.

It’s funny and sweet and a little bit romantic. It was written by D.E. Stevenson in 1934 and lovingly brought back to printing life by my beloved Persephone Books.

So, which tea goes well with this book? How about The Huntington Library’s Huntington Blend? This black tea contains florals, citrus and vanilla, which makes it the perfect companion to a fun, breezy, easy read. What sayeth you?

And of course, there is a Pinterest board for this tea pairing. xoxo, Jane

Pairing tea with books (The Making of a Marchioness)

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Via Persephone Books

Have you read The Making of a Marchioness (this Amazon affiliate link is for the free ebook) by Frances Hodgson Burnett? Yes, Frances Hodgson Burnett is the Frances Hodgson Burnett of The Secret Garden.

I love The Making of a Marchioness so much. I read it a few years ago and my Persephone edition sits proudly on my bookshelf.

At first glance, it appears to be a love story. But once you start reading, the plot darkens into a more realistic portrayal of the stark reality of women in late Victorian England.

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Just when Miss Emily Fox-Seton, our lovely heroine, resigns herself to spinsterhood, she meets Lord Walderhurst who sweeps her off her feet and makes her his marchioness. So far so good.

But then, Lord Walderhurst has to travel abroad for work. Unbeknownst to him, he leaves his wife in the hands of a few nefarious people. I don’t want to give the plot away, but it’s really a must-read.

This brings me to the theme of our post. Which tea shall we pair it with?

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Via Twinings Tea USA

How about Twinings Lady Grey? It’s a softer version of Earl Grey and it’s fitting for Emily, who is strong but gentle. What do you think?

Also, I created a Pinterest board for this pairing. xoxo, Jane

This post contains Amazon affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. It doesn’t cost you anything extra to use the links, but it’s also ok if you don’t use the links. I’m just grateful you are here and reading my blog. xoxo, Jane

Pairing books with tea (Meg Cabot’s The Boy Is Back)

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This week’s tea/book match is for a modern book. The Boy Is Back is a modern-day epistolary novel, it’s hilarious and feel-good.

So which tea is appropriate to drink with this novel? (Just to be clear, you can drink any tea you want. We are just having fun here.) I think a tea without caffeine, that’s meant for relaxing, would be best.

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Image via Twinings

How about Twining’s Buttermint? I think it works because Buttermint is perfect for relaxing around the house and The Boy Is Back is a perfect read for down-time.

What do you think? Also, check out my Pinterest board for this pairing.

xoxo, Jane

Pairing books with tea (Pride & Prejudice)

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Pride & Prejudice is the original romance novel. And I think that sassy Lizzie Bennet is the original heroine. She needs no introduction! She’s strong, she’s fierce, she’s funny, she’s loyal and she’s witty. 

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Which brings us to our tea pairing.

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(c) Fortnum & Mason

The perfect tea match for Pride & Prejudice is Fortnum’s Fortmason. Fortmason is a strong, black tea perfumed with orange blossom. 

Fortnum’s description:

A fine blend of Indian and China teas that is then perfumed with the delicate aroma of orange blossom to produce a subtle, floral flavour. Fortnum’s aromatic Fortmason Tea Blend is best served in the afternoon with or without milk.

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This week, we’re taking it one step further and drinking out of the teacup made by Burleigh exclusively for Fortnum & Mason.

What do you think of this week’s tea pairing? xoxo, Jane

PS. This tea pairing has a Pinterest board.

Pairing books with tea (Persuasion)

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It’s time for another book/tea pairing.

Jane Austen’s Persuasion is one of my favorite novels. It has all the elements I love in a romantic novel: love lost and love found, a returning hero, an “older” heroine (mostly because I was “older” when I married), ridiculous, over-the-top family members (because we can all relate) and a very romantic letter. What’s not to love about this novel?

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(c) Fortnums

It’s no secret that my favorite tea is Fortnum’s Countess Grey. I’m not kidding when I say I want to live inside Fortnum’s. Can you just lock me in there and throw away the key? Anyway, it only makes sense to pair my two favorites together. So, next time you read Persuasion, brew yourself a cup of Countess Grey. I’m sure you will find it a perfect combination.

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Austen’s last novel, Persuasion was published in 1818. In this scene, Captain Wentworth gives Anne Elliot his note of declaration. (Photo by Ann Ronan Pictures/Print Collector/Getty Images)

PS. Here is the Pinterest board for this pairing.

Pairing books with tea (Jane Eyre)

I love books and I love drinking tea so I found a way to combine my two favorite things.

Pairing books with tea!

We’ll start with Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and the tea I enjoy on weekday mornings, Earl Grey.

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circa 1840: English novelist Charlotte Brontë (1816 – 1855), author of Jane Eyre.

Earl Grey tea was named after Charles Grey, the 2nd Earl of Grey, who was prime minister of England in the 1800s. Earl Grey is a black tea infused with bergamot, which gives the tea its citrusy flavor.

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Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey by George Romney. Whig politician and British Prime Minister (22 November 1830 – 16 July 1834).

We are pairing Twinings Earl Grey with Jane Eyre because the tea is dark and moody but is uplifted with citrus. The book’s plot is dark and moody too, but is uplifted with a happy ending (let’s not even touch on the “madwoman” in the attic plot line because I still don’t know how to wrap my head around that).

Which tea would you pair with Jane Eyre?

Also, I created a Pinterest board for this post. xoxo, Jane