Thursday Reading Links #60

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Hello, there. How are you?

Today’s readings links are brought to you by yours truly.

This was an interesting read about how boredom can spark creativity. I do love being bored and having a lot of downtime. Though it hasn’t resulted in a masterpiece yet. Here’s hoping.

Just when I was telling you that I’m not going to buy any more of the Penguin Clothbound Classics, look what I found: this Sanditon edition. Of course, I couldn’t resist ordering it and it’s on the way. Yippee!

Photo Essay: Bookstores Are Opening, Cautiously, Across the Country.

20 Must-Read Free Classics You Can Find on Project Gutenberg.

In case you missed it, yesterday I wrote about my thoughts on Francesca Wade’s Square Haunting.

This is so cool. Roman mosaic floor found underneath vines in northern Italy. I can’t believe how beautiful (and new) the recently discovered Roman mosaics look.

Have a great day!

xoxo, Jane

 

Thursday Reading Links #59 (Cold War Edition)

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I don’t have any appropriate pictures for this post, so let’s just pretend this trail from my walk is a dead drop.

I’m working on a series of novels (Book 1 is in the editing phase, Book 2 needs to be rewritten and Books 3, 4 and 5 are in the draft outline phase) set during the Cold War. So, I thought I would make today’s reading links all about the Cold War.

What I Learned From Women Who Were Prisoners of the Gulag.

The Long History of the Red Scare as an American Political Tactic, an interview with Kathryn Olmstead, professor of history at the University of California, Davis.

Capitalism’s Baby Mania.

Nazi who arrested Anne Frank became a spy for West Germany.

Activist or spy? The curious case of a Cold War nuclear scientist.

Four Books about the Cold War.

My life under surveillance after I married a KGB agent.

Not about the Cold War, but set during the Reagan administration: Dee Snider on PMRC Hearing: I Was a Public Enemy. Dee Snider of the band Twisted Sister talks about his senate hearing. It’s a fascinating read because he is being brutally honest and doesn’t mind calling people on their hypocrisy. I had no idea that this was even an issue in the 1980s. Sometimes I wonder if politicians create drama and waste taxpayer money because they have too much time on their hands. (Sounds like Dee would agree with me.)

Let me know what you think of the articles.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #58

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Today’s reading links are brought to you by Mother Nature. Enjoy! Have a great day!!

The debate: how many books should you have on the go at once?

This was really fun. Highly recommended to take the quiz. This Soothing Quiz Will Tell You What Feel-Good Book To Read.

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Our new lockdown game: judging famous people by their bookshelves.

Ok, I loved this! I own the same books as a duchess. Footnotes: The Duchess of Cambridge’s viral bookshelf.

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This article is old but it still applies, especially now. The Guardian view on the joy of books: time for guiltless pleasures.

And in case you missed it, pairing books with tea (Emma).

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #57

 

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Cheerful flowers for your day.

Earlier this week, I reviewed The Tales of Beedle the Bard.

And if you’d like to read more about this book —> everything you need to know about The Tales of Beedle the Bard.

Virtual Book Events for 2020.

Why Jane Austen’s ‘Emma’ Still Intrigues 200 Years Later. I finished Emma recently, but I haven’t seen the latest film yet. Admittedly, I’m not sure I feel intrigued by her or the plot. She is definitely my least favorite Austen heroine thus far. Though I still need to read Mansfield Park. What are your thoughts?

A New Bookstore in the Latin Quarter is Selling Poetry By the Gram.

Also, an earlier post: What to read when you need an escape.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #56

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I have been enjoying Belgravia very much. No surprise there. It’s the highlight of my week. (Sad, but we are living through some intense days.) The Armchair Anglophile published recaps of each episode. They are funny, insightful and snarky. Highly recommended. Just don’t read ahead to the recaps you haven’t seen the episodes for. (Unless you don’t mind spoilers.)

If you’d like to burn hours on the internet, may I recommend the military maps of George III? Happy browsing.

13 Books Where the Earth Comes Alive. I’ve only read one from this list, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.

Fashion Plates. I’d love a modern version of this dress.

A Brief Tour into the World of Cozy Mystery Authors.

Which languages are easiest for native English speakers to learn? Insightful!

The Economics Behind Grandma’s Tuna Casseroles. This was fascinating to read. I’m not going to make fun of 1950s American food ever again.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #55 (Bibliophile Edition)

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Capitol Hill Books

I’ve been using more of my own photography on the blog, as opposed to stock photos. I took this picture years ago at Capitol Hill Books in Washington, D.C.

Another bookstore nearby is East City Bookshop. Well worth the visit when the pandemic is behind us.

A few more book-related links:

I like pairing books with tea.

I enjoy reading the bookish articles at Book Riot.

Seven French Food Books.

The Books Briefing: What Personal Letters Reveal About Human Struggles.

Bookshops in Bath.

By the Book: Classic Literature in Film/TV.

Shakespeare & Sons Bookshop in Prague.

Be well and stay safe!

xoxo, Jane

 

 

Thursday Reading Links #54

 

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Blossoms in the wind.

The first episode of Belgravia is available in the US on Epix. I loved the book by Julian Fellowes and am excited to watch the series.

I paired Belgravia with a cup of tea. Now you know which tea to drink while watching the TV adaptation. Speaking of Belgravia, this is an interesting history piece about what happened at the Duchess of Richmond’s ball.

This is totally me. You too? British costume dramas are keeping me sane.

We’re all alone. So let’s get lost in these paintings of parties.

The Library of Congress is republishing classic crime fiction by American writers. The first one was released earlier this month, That Affair Next Door by Anna Katherine Green. The titles are found in the Library’s collection of out-of-print and forgotten books. The covers are inspired by images from the Library’s collection. How cool is that?  The books are published by Poisoned Pen Press, which is the same company that publishes the British Library Crime Classics.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #53

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Only feel-good links today.

These Artists Are Making Free Coloring Pages For You To Enjoy.

If you like looking at pictures of home libraries, then The Captive Reader has you covered.

The best podcasts for book-lovers and creatives.

You can create your own perfume at Musée du Perfum. Someday I’m going to do this!

French Cultural Institutions Providing Free Content Online.

The Birth of Fashion Magazines.

The History of Dewy Skin.

A pretty teacup.

What to read when you need an escape.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #52

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Discovered this wall during a social distancing walk.

Dear April,

Please be nicer to us. March was a bear.

xoxo, Jane

Congratulations, You’re Moving In with A Reader! Cute read.

A wonderful article about Maria Branwell, mother of the extraordinary Brontës.

Wild goats take over Welsh town amid coronavirus lockdown. There are pictures! The pictures will certainly make you smile.

A Bookstore of One’s Own. The New York Times on Persephone Books. (There may be a paywall.)

A nighttime routine for a better sleep. Which I’m sure we all need right now.

Thank you for stopping by. Be well, friends! xoxo, Jane

 

The Occasional Weekly Recap

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A lovely tea set through the window of an antique shop during a social distancing walk.

I hope you had a good week! My week was fine, but I have so many worries lingering over me that it’s hard to really enjoy much right now. I know you probably feel the same.

On a lighter note, this week was another busy book blogging week. Below is a recap for your reading pleasure.

Happy reading!

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From the same walk, but I promise I was not near anyone.

Favorite Book Series: Clara Vine

Pairing books with tea (Let’s Bring Back)

What to read when you need an escape

Thursday Reading Links #51

London Book Haul

Also, come have tea with me on Instagram. I’m on Twitter too, but Instagram is my fave.

xoxo, Jane

Thursday Reading Links #51

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With spring comes hope.

If you are in need of distraction, or find yourself with some free time, then you’ve come to the right place. !!

The Queen of Paris was the perfect historical novel to lose myself in.

How bookshops are helping with isolation.

Jane Austen – Her Life in Words (YouTube).

The first lines of 10 classic novels, rewritten for social distancing. This was a fun read.

Here’s how much Europe’s royal families really cost. I’ve always wondered.

The playboy Serbian spy who inspired James Bond. When life becomes art?

Social distancing doesn’t have to doom your weekends. I’m basically reading everything now.

Coronavirus: What this crisis reveals about US – and its president. You probably don’t need to read this article to know what it says about Mr. Trump.

The Etiquette of Social Distancing around Coronavirus by Emily Post.

xoxo, Jane

 

 

 

Thursday Reading Links #50

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I would like COVID-19 to go away and never return and I’d love for spring-like weather to get here.

I have anxiety because of the coronavirus, the state of the union and the unknown. I’m going to take it one day at a time, do my part to be a good neighbor and stay home as much as possible. If you are home and want to read something, here is a mish-mash of reading links.

How you can support bookstores during the coronavirus pandemic.

This is a light-hearted read by beloved author Meg Cabot. How to Shelter in Place aka Work from Home in the Age of Corona.

Oh, Do Tone It Down, Ladies. “Docile quietude has long been wielded by conduct books as a specifically feminine virtue.”

Six Castles You Can Visit in the United States. I’m on my way!

The failed escape: Sheikha Latifa’s doomed flight from Dubai. How awful! I am so horrified. The way women must suffer in so many parts of the world without us ever knowing. It breaks my heart and I wish I could be a superwoman so I can swoop in and bring women and children to safety.

Very good writing advice: you gotta tell the story.

Podcast: Evelyn Nesbit and the Crime of the Century.

An Introvert at a Writer’s Conference.

Hmmm, are you a ‘cultural’ fit for your job?

Remember how WeWork was the latest craze? WeWork began the shared space phenomenon, which isn’t a bad idea. Companies and solo business owners now have options to rent space for much cheaper than signing expensive, long-term leases. Anyway, I digress. Nothing good lasts forever and the origin of WeWork seems…interesting, for lack of better words. Rebekah Neumann’s Search for Enlightenment Fueled WeWork’s Collapse.

If you’re in the Commonwealth of Virginia, Historic Garden Week has been cancelled, but you can at least still look at pictures of gardens and flowers from past years.

Four Books That Make Astonishing Use of Maps.

xoxo, Jane